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waving because of an impending decision at the united nations. i'll ask israel's ambassador to the united states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound du
with respect to united nations convention on this they are fairly outrageous. and what they're looking for, at the end of the day is respect, respect out the table and respect for who they are and what they are doing. and semi-we can define the means to bring these two solitudes together because at the end of the day any conflicts, whether it's kinetic or otherwise, that adversely affects the sultry to that part of the world will have a fundamentally adverse impact on the global economy spent it's doing it now with china and japan. that's interesting, as you've got two of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises a fundamental question, and it's of ending this myth that economics draws people closer together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?." during the cold war, what was interesting is you can have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and if two and if to implement you it's about 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment figuring out how to communicate and how to coordinate, how to deal with escalation, how do you talk
to the senator and i understand colleagues on the other side of the aisle have concerns about the united nations and i respect that. we've had the space before, but i'm having difficulty finding where the threat gains any reality the senator has described specifically with respect to children the senator mentioned the question of the committee being created and sometimes committee make recommendations outside the purview of something. while that may be true, but when have words -- i guess the senator, when have words or suggestions that have no power, they cannot be implemented, but have no access to the courts, that have no effect on the web the united states and cannot change the lot of the united states, when has that ever threatened anybody in our country? >> one of the united states ratifies -- >> does the senator agreed there's no power to change our love? >> no, i don't agree. >> and the senator show where it is specifically when the supreme court has held this is not self-executing. there's no access to american courts when it is clear by the statements of the treaty itself there's no la
the palestinians prejudged everything by going to the united nations and getting them effectively declared as a state. in the same way they say the israeli government is now doing the same thing, taking the land and effectively removing it from the peace negotiations with the palestinians. it's a very sensitive political move, very controversial. the one that israelis say they will go ahead with and build these homes. of course it will take several years. >> martin, the overwhelming vote in the united nations to change the wording, if you will, of the palestine as being an entity observer rather to an observer state, i mean with all of the dialogue and the hopes about building two states living side by side, how much does that wording make a difference? and what's the reaction been there? >> well you know, as you suggest the wording is so slight, the difference is so slight certainly it's mostly symbolic. there's no doubt that until the palestinians get their own state, any phrasing in the united nations is symbolic. it does give a real practical relationship between the palestinians and t
last 22 years to find out how we did it, what they can do. so here was the united nations who said okay, we'll come up with a convention, a treaty, all countries, put it out for them to sign up which encourages them to pale actually emulate what we did. this would have given us a seat at the table. we would be sitting at the table, helping other countries to bring their laws more up to what ours are in terms of the rights of people with disabilities. but we turned our backs on that. turned our backs on it. you know, mr. president, if -- there are a lot of things that make america a shining city on a hill but there's one thing that no one can dispute that does put america as a shining city on a hill, and that is the americans with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barrier
service. she's done a great job i think for us at the united nations. she's fought tirelessly for america's interests in very difficult times. when the united nations is a place where we often face significant challenges. and i understand that there was a lot of concern and anger initially about benghazi and about what happened and about the differences and reports but as this has been peeled back and more and more of the details have come out as best as i can make sense of it, the persistent criticism of her is that she represented the administration, went on talking -- went on different talk shows and went different radio shows and presented it based on intelligence she was given. this is far from the first time that a secretary of state u.n. ambassador has been given bad intelligence and repeated it publicly and why that makes her somehow unfit to serve as secretary of state is beyond me. in my view, if there's some unhappiness about the incidence in benghazi, some deep concern about security, there ought to be
and finally, our ambassador of the united nation who appeared on every national sunday show has now said she gave false information concerning how this tragedy happened. >> think about this for a second. we knew all the details of the bin laden raid right away. why would it take ten weeks to figure out all of the details of the benghazi raid? think about this just for a second. the bin laden raid, for the record, was our raid. we planned it. america planned it. we knew all the details of it right away because it was our idea. america carried it out. the attack on the consulate in benghazi was not us, unless that's the next part of your giant cover-up conspiracy. different things, right? done by different people. there is obviously something else going on here, right? the purported concern here. what we are supposed to believe about this whole benghazi scandal, the purported concern is, i'm sorry for the language. it is getting stupider and stupider by the day to the point of being a really special kind of stupid by now. i will just say that on the other side of this, my personal cockamamy co
recognized by the united nations. the joy short-lived. how israel's decision to pursue even more settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem may kill any hopes of peace. we'll dive deep lie into this issue. >>> rp says it's not changing plans for the controversial housing development in east of jerusalem also developments in east jerusalem. this is despite getting a diplomatic mackdown recently from australia, five european countries and the united states bought in on this yesterday. now here's why this is such a big deal. the proposed construction would effectively cut off the west bank from cities of like bethlehem and ramallah, will cut them off from jerusalem. and that's important for the palestinians, it would mean that they couldn't get to east jerusalem, which they would eventually claim as the capital of their nation if that is to be. the large israeli settlement town of ma ale adumim would be connected to jerusalem directly. vice president for new initiatives and a distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson international center. always good to talk to you. israel defined as i i
't be prouder of the job she has done. >> susan rice has done a great job as our ambassador to the united nations and of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president but i'm very happy he has the opportunity with a second term to make a decision. >> but they're not just going to have to convince props even some democrats were reluctant to overtly support her. jon tester said: >> joe manchin damaged it saying: >> in fact, john kerry's name has come up. susan collins said he would be easily confirmed. senator baroso backed him. even john mccain, leading the charge against rice had high praise for john kerry on fox news yesterday. >> john kerry came within a whisker of being president of the united states. i think that works in his favor but i'd love to hear him make his case, but i don't have anything in his background like this tragedy in again gassy that would make me really want to carefully examine the whole situation. >> of course it doesn't hurt that if kerry took the job it would open up a senate seat that could go to republican scott brown who just lost his seat t
to the united nations. and of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president. >> today, republican senators continued to try to open up the massachusetts senate seat that scott brown could run for. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and would be easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> if the president wants an easy confirmation hearing and process, nominate john kerry, who is imminently qualified to be secretary of state and i believe he would sail through in the nominating process. >> joining me now, ari mel ber. ari, you're coming to us tonight from kerry country, boston and i've got to think this is a horrible moment for senator kerry. you don't want to be the guy who gets praise from the mindless attackers of susan rice. >> yeah, i don't think he wants any part of this very weird b m boomerang play the republicans are trying to practice. he knows her well because as chairman of foreign relations committee, he oversees the state department, looking at the diplomacy and ambassadors and working with secretary clinton and ambassador rice. >> well, t
's dealing with syria gaza, the congo. she's still our representative to the united nations. so while we're talking this foolishness about her appearance on a tv talk show, what signal is that sending to the rest of the world? i do think they've got themselves backed in a corner now. i think the other agenda going on is the senate race. so i think that it needs to stop. i hope it will today. i know she's back on the hill again today. >> bill: she is. first of all, it is unfair at so many levels. i think it is sexist and racist. ambassador to the united nations, god knows is not responsible for security. embassies and consulates around the world number one. we talked about this earlier. number two, all she did in her appearance on the sunday shows and in her testimony right after the incident in benghazi on the hill was say here is what our intelligence agencies are telling us at this point. we don't know everything about it yet. you know. and that's -- that's kind of classic. you never know, right? immediately, al
this afternoon in the united nations general assembly. palestine palestinians are asking to be upgraded to nonmember state. if it passes it is a u.n. recognition of palestine statehood. mahmoud abass is in new york to witness the vote. the united states, israel and other western countries oppose this move by the palestines. palestinians. more than a dozen european countries are supporting this rez lug. the uk says it may vote yes pending a couple of conditions. the u.s. has supported a two-state resolution for palestinians and israelis. why do american officials oppose u.n. recognition? >> for the most part it won't give the palestinians what they want, which is an actual state. this vote is largely symbolic. it would have no effect on the palestinian sovereignty or borders or any of the things they're looking for. israel is vehemently opposed to this vote. it said it threatened to cut off aid to the palestinians, impose new checkpoints if they do so. what the u.s. is fearing here is that if this vote goes ahead, and we see that it's pretty much a guarantee that it will -- that the pale
threat to the united states' national security. as chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, i got asked that all the time. i answered in two words: our debt. i think i surprised him. today 15 former senior national security officials who served across eight presidential administrations have formed a coalition to stress the need for elected officials to act. for not only has the passage of time exacerbated some of the economic problems, it has revealed a perhaps equally-dangerous political one. our inability to grapple with pressing fiscal challenges represents nothing less than a crisis in our democratic order. compounding the instability and unpredictability in a volatile world. our propositions for this coalition are simple. the national security of the united states depends on its economic health. that health must be insured by averting the immediate crises and by laying the groundwork for a rigorous, long-term program of debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth and lower income inequality. in national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently in res
. >>> the other big story we're watching for you, a second round of sitdowns for united nations ambassador susan rice, who's in an all-out campaign of her own to face her critics. after three republicans issued blistering comments yesterday, this morning rice is meeting with republican senator susan collins of maine and in an hour is expected to meet with senator bob corker of tennessee. rice's harshest krit eks are still vowing to block her potential nomination as next secretary of state. >> i think everybody gets to, one, be nominated, and, two, go through the hearings and the debate and discussion. but right now i would be very hard-press hard-pressed. >> what they're suging is that she said things for political reasons three weeks before the election. >> what's the long game, willy? what are they doing? this doesn't help the republican party. >> that is the big question. what is the long game? let's dig down. we have our wednesday political power panel, msnbc contributor joanne reed, managing editor for the gree owe, msnbc contributor arty melbourne, also a cords for the nation, and republic
't believe the u.n. should sign on as party to any united nations convention and because a two-thirds super majority is rard to ratify a treaty, that opposition means it will be close and they may lose. yesterday kerry told reporters he is about four votes short but thinks a handful of senators might still be willing to sign on. in an effort to win those 11th hour votes, former senator bob dole who was there when the ada, americans for disability act, was negotiated and signed in the early '90s, is expected to be present on the senate floor or at least right next to the floor when the vote actually takes place. of course dole was just optized at walter reed army medical center last week. his public appearances are very, very rare these days. he'll be honored late they are morning and then he'll be sitting there watching as some senators potentially walk by him to make that decision to vote against a treaty that he has been campaigning very hard for. the tough time this treaty is having is the latest sign of the growing isolationist party. yesterday the president used a speech celebrating th
the united nations is making a move to recognize the palestinians. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announc
the united nation's reviews much more than that. i [inaudible] >> before anyone can make an intelligent decision regarding someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more for the state. we don't have the fbi interviews of the survivors one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said tonight at the attack has been shared with congress says that this day. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends thought like john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision qualification. john bolton the ambassador and democrats talk in their fields saying we're not going to vote, not going to consider this nomination until they get basic answers to our concerns. .. >> we are now live with condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public schools. they will discuss america's education system and its impact on security. it is part of a event hosted by the excellence in foundation for education. right now we are listening to introductory remarks. >> the first african-american woman to
will boost the leverage in future peace talks. >> united nations meeting in dubai is looking to update how the world the government deals with the world wide web. a lot of people are not too sure what will come out of this. 123 people u.s. delegation like a will and microsoft are worried that and and that security could be used to justify with blocks. the gathering will confront questions that include how much sway the you in can exert over efforts. and expanding the internet and to developing nations. >> john mcafee is living the life of a fugitive. he blocked an unconfirmed report saying he was arrested on the border of police in mexico. he is running from police who want to question him about the death of his neighbor. the report of his arrest came within 24 hours of him giving his first and person interviews into making a run for it. the mayor of san pedro told the panel's report of his apprehension are not true. police in belize are san they have no idea where he is or what city he has supposedly been captured in. coming up on the kron for morning news and live look at the james lick
resolution the united nations general assembly that just passed. because it places further obstacles in the path to peace. we have been clear that only through direct negotiations between the parties can the palestinians and israelis achieve the peace they both deserve. two states for two peoples. they sovereign a viable independent palestine living side-by-side with a jewish and democratic israel. my longtime friend and colleague ehud barak is here. i knowed he would agree with that as both of the most decorated soldier in israeli history and as a distinguished public servants. i have more to say about this later, but i did want to begin by recognizing the challenge that this will surely present. i want to add my words of welcome to all of you. i want to thank bill for being here -- we reallyvery much appreciate your participation. foreign minister -- a good friend and colleague who is a top global thinker, well deserved because of the careful comprehensive views he has developed over many years of hard work about issues fundamental to freedom. of course, i see right before me a won
was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation. so winning the civil rights a precondition of winning the liberty across the globe. no i think looking from the outside if you'll forgive me, the same danger now. go to china and i criticize them for the lack of democracy. but they say yes, they are educating all of their people. in the middle east and i talked to people there on the edge of radicalism. they say look at the -- [inaudible] justices in your british and european and ame
and information to follow up on. the united nations and from a program says the burning of coal is the single most largest anthropogenic source of mercury air emissions, have a more than tripled since 1970. coal burning is increasing alongside at it -- alongside economic growth. this is from a report. there was a report done by the university of texas that showed a statistically significant link between pounds of industrial release of mercury and increased austism rates. autism prevalence was reduced by 1% to 10% from the pollution source. the background of the study was that during the time the studied by the texas team, they quoted the us epa estimating environmental mercury releases at 158 million tons annually nationwide in the late 1990's. when will -- are you aware of any studies other than this texas study that has a link between neurotoxic chemicals and the environment and increased rates of autism ? >> i am aware of other studies, for instance the one i mentioned earlier, looking at auto emissions and pregnancy early in life. clearly an association between that exposure and autism rates.
took a lot of heat when he served as u.s. ambassador to the united nations. >> yeah. and toure said to me on twit wither, well, mccain called rice mentally inferior, which he never did. i said, well, when did she say this -- jon: i'm sorry to cut you off, but we have some breaking news. john boehner, the speaker of the house is speaking out now about the fiscal cliff, let's listen in. >> the bigger problem here, which is our national deficit and our national debt. this debt doesn't exist because we don't tax small businesses enough, it exists because washington continues to spend too much. and raising taxes on small businesses instead of taking a balanced approach that also cuts spending is wrong. it's only going to make it harder for our economy to grow. and if our economy doesn't grow, americans don't get new jobs. and the debt problem that we have will continue to threaten our children's future. as i said the day after the election, republicans are not seeking to impose our will on the president. we're seeking a bipartisan solution that can pass both chambers of congress and be s
of the acceptance in the united nations. the u.s. rejected the decision. a hurricane sandy victim surprised with a new genority. >> there is not a word in the dictionary to express my appreciation and openance at this moment. that is 95 year old pete who was living without heat or water and power. a contractor saw the story and rebuilt the house from top to bottomment >> he didn't know me from adam and look. see what he did. he's wonderful. >> the contractor said he plan to help more storm victims rebuild their lives. >> finally a happy ending. >> should illegals get a break on in state tuition on the backs of legal students. outrage from constitients forced one to fight back. >> steve: how can you make your relationship work? the answer is right under your nose? what does that mean? we'll explain straight ahead. >> our next gests said it is it not fair to taxpayers and wanting to resprerse that policy. massachusetts governor duval patrick. how important is it now. james lyons. representative, why does this bother you so much? >> it is it sending the wrong message. the governor is forcing t
. margaret anderson was living her dream, working with her husband at mount rainier national park as a united states park ranger. her duties were not confined to patrolling, but ranged from supervision of snowplow areas to medical coordination and instruction for her fellow staff members. anderson was described by her colleagues as a candid and honest co-worker who could always bring a smile to your face. on new year's day, anderson blocked the road with her patrol car to hinder the escape of a man who crashed through a checkpoint. little did she know at that time that the man was a suspect in an earlier shooting that wounded four people. the suspect shot at her while she was still blocking the road with her patrol car and she was fatally wounded. mr. speaker, national park ranger margaret anderson made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. i urge passage of this bill to honor her on behalf of all of our colleagues in the house, especially the washington dedication. and this -- passage of this bill is dedicated to her family and to the united states park service. i urge passage of h.r.
of these foreign national students trained in these stem fields to stay here in the united states and help create jobs here in the united states. this bill actually goes a step further, and what it does is it provides them a green card, a green card, which is the first step toward a path to citizenship. if you believe that this is a self-inflicted wound on our economy, you're exactly right, our current policy. we're educating brilliant students and then compelling them to go to work in shanghai or singapore rather than san antonio or the silicon valley. meanwhile, we're handing out tens of thousands of diversity visas to immigrants chosen by a random lottery, without regard to any qualifications they might when it comes to job creation and entrepreneurship. it makes absolutely no sense. i believe we need an immigration policy that serves our national interest. and if there's one thing that we need more than anything else now is we need job creators and entrepreneurs in the united states. and we know in the -- in the global economy, it's people with the special skills in science, technology, engin
/11, 2001, and talk to a nations, of very international crowd and ask what they thought of the united states, admired the united states and they resented the united states because it that time they didn't believe there were any boundaries to what could be done. that looks at the united states as the most innovative place in the world, constantly pull rabbits out of the hat and reinvent itself. go around world today facie a nation constrained, tied down, exhausted, limited, militarily overreaching, economically--even talking to tim geithner, can you go around and tell other economies what to do when you're in a glass house? it has been real limiting. when you look at barack obama's first meeting with angela merkel in london when the global economy was on fire is interesting. she laid down the gauntlet. we are not going to play by your rules. we are not going to spend like you are telling us to do. it has been interesting as a superpower to look at all limits we have even influencing a nation like germany. and yet brussels i asked to you think america has the same growth we once had that could
to become the most read filipino newspaper in the united states with circulation of 120,000. he's founding chairperson of national federation of philippine american association, been a voice for immigrants rights, farm workers struggle and -- equity for over five decades. last month he received a lifetime achievement award from the filipino-american press club. he is survived by his wife and seven kids. >> clerk calvillo: thank you, supervisor avalos. supervisor mar. >> supervisor mar: thank you. i first wanted to ask if we could -- meeting in memorium for fay bingham. she passed away november 2, 2012 at the age of 91. she was born in harrison, southh dakota. she moved to san francisco and resided in richmond for at least -- for the last 56 years. she was a long time member of local 2, the hotel and restaurant workers union and worked at the fairmont hotel, and also at the st. francis hotel and ended her career at the bakery. she is preceded in death by her husband who served three years in the coast guard and 30 in the navy. fay will be missed by her two sisters in michigan plus many her
point. on your second point, the opec nations in being friends of the united states, i think the answer to that is that both sides have had a relationship that has been economically necessary, but i do not think the opec cartel conducts its affairs in a way to benefit the united states of america. they conduct their affairs so that they do not kill the goose that laid the golden egg. if you turn into the record on pages 8 and 9, you're asking for some visual clues as to what's going on here. if you look on page 8 coming will see the united states is paying about $20 million per month to import petroleum. you see the sharp rise in the line just before 2008 and then it sort of flat lines from 2008 going through the significant dip that was represented by the subprime mortgage meltdown. what's interesting about it is from that point forward it has remained about 50% of the balance of payments and deficits. that is because the oil cartel prices the marginal barrel of oil as what it costs to get it out of the ground and what the maximum is that they cannot pay without tipping the consumers o
.o.t., in comparison, in 1958 through 2012, the united states has invested $1.4 trillion in our nation's highways, $538 billion in aviation, $266 billion in transit, and yet amtrak, which was created in 1971, has received a small fraction of that funding at $41 billion. when you consider that and compare it to the oil and gas industry, which received $441 billion in federal subsidies, although more than half of those have been available to the energy sector. we have spent to bring that together, we spent more in one year with the oil and gas and energy companies and their industry than we have spent in the entire life of the program of amtrak. clearly there seems to be an imbalance and it's not one that should be continued. regarding the vision of high speed rail, the amtrak excela service is one of those alternatives and know it may only achieve the speeds of average of 83 miles per hour, along the n.e.c., surely that is significantly better than the long delays in crawling engagor interstate systems that we have. this committee should continue the role as it always has to facilitate the development o
up for those earning more $250,000. >> 138 nations voted to granted the palestinian authority status as a non-member observer state. israel and united states voted against the controversial measure which could make it easier for the palestinian authority to pursue israel in international courts. palestinian president mahmoud abbas called it a last chance for a peaceful two state settlement. >> just ahead, a bay area's woman battle against cancer. >> how social media is bringing >>> traditional fund-raising usually involves something like a bake sale or auction. >> social media opened a new arena. >> it is called cloud funding and michael finney is here tonight, apparently it works. >> it really does. it is a game changer. i reported earlier about a local elementary school where they were able to raise cash by using a cloud funding site. thousands of folks are raising money from everything from making movies to paying medical bills. for one san francisco woman who is fighting cancer, it has done more. it has brought hope. michelle mingle west side the horses that roam free on this son
not only with the national domestic workers alliance, the domestic workers united here in the new york, i think we see the emergence of a 21st century labor movement. discovering solidarity and action and being willing to take the risk with a lot of support around them to step out and say, no, these are my rights. i want the right to organize. i want these labor protections and i'm willing to do whatever it takes to get them. >> i want to come to you as soon as we come back. the fact that you are a doctoral candidate in sociology after the story you told us is fascinating and worth hearing more about. i also want to ask whether or not labor laws can make a difference for domestic workers when we come back. this holiday, share everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supp
free market economics you want talent and youth coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, rahmny, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how rahmny would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate rahmny was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what rahmny didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goaly. they just shot goals on him for four years and
to a balance plan to put our national debt act down to sustainable levels. the united states i believe is that a critical junction. we can come together and show the world that we still have responsible actors. people are watching, do we still have it? i spent a few days last fall meeting with the european leaders meeting with finance ministers and the head of the european commission to try to get a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. we need to lead. uncertainty leads business -- leaves the business is the sidelines. -- at the sidelines. they do not higher, especially with all that cash. confidence matters. it especially matters in our economy. we need long-term fiscal reductions so people can pine for the future. we need to give families and businesses a certainty and the specific spending cuts specific revenue increases that reduce the deficit a
coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, romney, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how romney would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate romney was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what romney didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goalie. they just shot goals on him for four years and some of them went through and some of them didn't a
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understands issues of poverty and pandemic and how though pray into national security and foreign policy. jon: on the other hand, senator mccain says, john kerry came within a whisker of being president of the united states, angela. senator mccain went on to say this, i would love to hear him make necessary case. i don't have anything in thinks background like the tragedy in gaziano that would make me carefully examine the situation. >> it is doing susan rice. if kerry is the nominee he would have smooth sailing through. in washington these are friends behind the scenes. if susan rice is nominee we'll have partisan politics. we have the liberal mainstream media already bashing republicans, some calling them racists and sexist in the fact they won't support susan rise because the fact she is a black woman. it is not about race. it is about benghazi. she went on the air and she lied. now she is trying to backpedal and not helping her case at all. >> but what i will say, you had condoleezza rice, she was confirmed by the senate 85-13. and what democrats said, this is at a time where she was unde
, the rest of the national conversation gets distorted and pulled way over to the right. that's what's happening. >> ron, i love the way you suggest that the real patriots are the ones who want to secede from the united states. it reminds me -- we once had a priest named father feeney. he didn't like the church's view because the church didn't support no salvation outside the church. so he leaves the church. that's just like -- wait a minute, you're one of them now. that doesn't make any sense. it's like we're so patriotic, we're going to leave this country. >> we're going to leave the country. they'll have to come up with a new name as they go. it's not just the south. parts of the plains, too, but it would seem to me as long as we could get like from the northeast -- could get air rights over canada to get to the west coast we could keep something of a nation together. >> what would be their preferred nation to join? >> you know they're not going to mexico. >> they ain't going to denmark. they don't like socialism. they're not going to go where all the white people are. what do the
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